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Job Interviews – How to Reassure the Paranoid Employer

Job Interviews - How to Reassure Your Paranoid InterviewerHiring the wrong person can cost an employer over $25,000 or even $50,000, according to a study by CareerBuilder.

It’s also well known that many candidates lie in job interviews or make exaggerated claims about their experience and skills.

Put these facts together and you can easily understand why interviewers may feel a little paranoid. Whether you’re saying you’re a fast learner, accurate with details, or passionate about the insurance industry – they’re not necessarily inclined to believe it.

Here are a few ways to convince an interviewer that you are as good as you say you are.

Prove it.

If you’re applying for a job in sales or marketing, make sure you sell and market yourself brilliantly. (The hardest product to sell may be yourself!) If it’s a creative job, show some creativity in an appropriate (not weird!) way. If the job is highly detail oriented, plan and execute every detail precisely.

You may want to consider presenting a 90-day plan an interviews, showing how you will ramp up to begin delivering results. This is common in interviews for sales positions, and it can be adapted to other openings as well. It takes time to write a smart, well-researched plan of action, but it offers strong evidence for your motivation and your understanding of the company and the job.

Have someone else speak for you.

Quote someone else’s words (mentioning that this person will be giving you a reference), show letters of recommendation, or refer to the recommendations in your LinkedIn profile.

Don’t have any recommendations on LinkedIn? Here’s how to request some.

Back up your claims with specifics.

If you tell about a project you did a good job with, describe in detail the situation, obstacles you overcame, actions you took and results. (See my article, Job Search Storytelling that SOARS for tips on telling success stories convincingly.) This is more believable than vague remarks.

Help your fearful interviewer feel confident about hiring you!

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