The GREAT JOB SOONER Blog

Laid Off? 2 Steps Before Taking Time Off

job search, layoff, laid offI’ve been laid off myself, and I know how it is. The first thing you want to do is recover from the shock of losing your job – and the stresses of having one! You may not have had a vacation in a long time. You deserve some time off.

There are at least two strong reasons why you should take a few small steps toward your job search first.

First of all, jobs come through people, and people are everywhere, all the time. Networking isn’t always a planned thing. Opportunities can come unexpectedly and suddenly. If nothing else, you may be asked “What happened to your job?” and the answer you give can nurture opportunities or squelch them. You need to prepare to communicate positively and clearly.

Second, it’s easy for a few weeks off to turn into a few months, while the “doomsday clock” of long-term unemployment (six months or more) ticks in the background. Taking even a baby step or two helps nip procrastination in the bud.

So before you take a couple weeks off, spend several hours over the course of a couple of days doing the following.

1. Prepare your answers to three key questions.

You will often be asked these three questions:

  • “What happened to your job?”
  • “What are you looking for now?”
  • “Would you tell me a little about yourself?” (or “Um, can you remind me what it is you do, anyway?”)

Your answers to these questions are sometimes called your Exit Statement, Job Objective Statement and Elevator Intro (or Positioning Statement), respectively.

Exit Statement: It’s natural to feel sad, anxious or angry after losing a job, and you’ll need to talk about your feelings with those closest to you. But advertising your wounds to the world can hold you back. A brief, positive, forward-looking answer assures others that you’re ready for job leads, introductions, and other valuable networking opportunities.

Example: “Well, I’m proud of what I achieved during my five years with XYZ & Co. Unfortunately a business decision was made that resulted in the elimination of 150 jobs, including mine. Now I’m looking forward to a couple weeks off and then starting to look for new opportunities along the lines of…”

Job Objective Statement: Your answer to “What are you looking for?” should be as clear and specific as possible. Try to include a job title (or a few related ones), the industry or industries you’re focusing on, what size of company you prefer and the geographic area you’d consider. A quick summary of these points will greatly help others understand what kind of information and introductions you’ll be interested in.

Elevator Intro: Of, the next question after “What happened to your job?” is “Can you remind me what it is that you do?”, which is very similar to how you’d reply in an interview to “Tell me about yourself.” You may want to start thinking about this now. Please see my previous post, “Job Interviews: “Tell me about yourself.”

2. Round Up Your Resume Resources.

If you’re thinking of hiring a professional to assist with your resume, cover letter, LinkedIn profile or other marketing materials, don’t wait until the last minute. You don’t want to have to choose someone based on availability rather than skill. Many writers have a normal turnaround time of a week or more, and may have a waiting list as well. Make the appointment ahead of time.

Look for credentials like a certification from a major resume writers’ association, and ask to see samples. Ask about the process, which ideally should be more in-depth than just a written questionnaire farmed out to a subcontractor. My own process is highly personalized and results in exceptionally effective career marketing tools. Please visit my website: www.theakelley.com for information and a free phone consultation.

If you’re a do-it-yourselfer, break the ice by identifying some resources and planning when you’ll start. My blog is a good source of information. I haven’t yet written a resume book, but there are some good ones by trusted experts like Wendy Enelow and  Susan Britten Whitcomb.

Open a path between yourself and opportunity. That way when you’re done with “R&R,” it will be that much easier to move forward!

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